AAOSA Seminar: “The Birth and Amazing Life of Nonlinear Optics”

Tuesday December 6, 2016 at 6:30 p.m.

herb_winful_g

Prof. Herbert  G. Winful
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering,
University of Michigan

Location of Seminar: 1123 Lurie Biomedical Engineering Building (LBME), 1101 BEAL AVE, Ann Arbor, MI

Abstract
The birth of the field of nonlinear optics occurred in Randall Laboratory at the University of Michigan in 1961 when Franken, Hill, Peters, and Weinreich observed for the first time the generation of optical harmonics.  By illuminating a crystal of quartz with an intense infrared beam at 694.3 nm from a ruby laser they were able to generate the second harmonic at 347.15 nm.  This discovery was rapidly followed by the observation of numerous other effects such as optical rectification, frequency mixing, third harmonic generation, self-focusing, and parametric oscillation, all within the space of about four years.  In this talk we review the birth, growth, and modern day applications of nonlinear optics.  We will also take the opportunity to plug the OSA Conference on Nonlinear Optics, July 17-21, 2017, in Hawaii:
http://www.osa.org/en-us/meetings/topical_meetings/nonlinear_optics_(nlo)/

Bio
Herbert Winful earned a BS in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1975 and a PhD from the University of Southern California in 1981. From 1980 to 1986 he was a Principal Member of Technical Staff at GTE Laboratories in Waltham, MA. He joined the EECS department at the University of Michigan as an associate professor in 1987, became a full professor in 1992, and was named a Thurnau Professor in 1993. He has made fundamental contributions to nonlinear fiber optics, nonlinear optics in periodic structures, the nonlinear dynamics of laser arrays, the propagation of single-cycle pulses, and the physics of tunneling. He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the American Physical Society, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. His many awards include the Arthur F. Thurnau Professorship, the Amoco/University Teaching Award, the State of Michigan Teaching Award, the College of Engineering Teaching Excellence and Service Excellence Awards, the EECS Professor of the Year Award (twice), the EECS Outstanding Achievement Award, the Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the Tau Beta Pi Distinguished Professor award.
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